Project Thread: 89 F250 Franken Truck

IDIBRONCO

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What is the best way to seal up the intake manifold and valley pan once I remove the pedestal?
I'd put the CDR back there. That's where it went on the N/A applications. Later, when you want to put the turbo back on, it's easy enough to remove it again. Why are you going to change out the adapter plate? They're all the same so there's no reason to change it unless there's some major damage to the one that's on there now.
 

The_Josh_Bear

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I re-torqued head bolts once and the only issue I ran into was that the head bolts over the exhaust manifold were dry, the rest oily. At the time I didn't change anything but in the future I would certainly oil those dry bolts up so they get the correct torque setting.
Make sure you only do one at a time!
I did them all to the lowest torque spec in the sequence and then did everything in order going up to the highest setting. Takes a while but it's a lot easier out of the truck I'm sure.

As for the turbo just get it rebuilt or buy the center housing yourself and reassemble. $500 well-spent if you ask me.
 

CalIDI

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As for the turbo just get it rebuilt or buy the center housing yourself and reassemble. $500 well-spent if you ask me.
I would love to do that, but I don't have the downpipe, and so not have the means to make one, because they are slip-fit. Having to rebuild, and not having downpipes makes it much less worth it to me.

Why are you going to change out the adapter plate? They're all the same so there's no reason to change it unless there's some major damage to the one that's on there now.
The current one is not damaged, but it is set up for a manual, and the transmission in the truck is an automatic. Am I wrong in thinking that they had different adapter plates, and flex plates/flywheels?

Ill keep y'all posted when I get the motor in. Will be ordering parts soon.

Thanks, and Happy Tinkering
-CalIDI
 

Nero

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Adapter plate on the block is the same regardless of auto or manual. Flex plate/flywheel will be different. I cannot say the same thing if the adapter for the trans is the same between automotive vs industrial applications, such as running an Allison or something.
 

CalIDI

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Adapter plate on the block is the same regardless of auto or manual. Flex plate/flywheel will be different. I cannot say the same thing if the adapter for the trans is the same between automotive vs industrial applications, such as running an Allison or something.
Good to know, thanks!
 

CalIDI

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Update:

Here is what has taken place since last post:
New glow plugs
New injector O-Rings
R&D fuel return Rails
New water pump and gaskets
New motorcraft thermostat and gaskets
Re torque heads (didn't remove bolts, just go through the torque sequence)
New valve cover gaskets
Flushed out water passages
Pulled the wiring harness from truck and installed it on the engine
New Air filter
New CDR tube and attached CDR
I will be installing

Still need to:
Rebuild oil cooler
Swap Fans
Block the turbo oil feed
Install the Driver's side Motor Mount
Prepare the GP controller for Manual Mode
Install the motor



Statements with Questions:
I removed the oil cooler and have the rebuild parts but haven't gotten the oil cooler apart. Its soaking with PB blaster for a bit. Any tips for separating the oil cooler? I really don't want to break it.

I also haven't gotten the fan off of the other motor yet. Need a bigger wrench, and gotta get out the torch. Tips welcome.

Our engine hoist (read: bobcat) needs an attachment plate rebuild. Being a rental in a past life it appears that the pins were never greased and this makes for an extremely loose attachment.
If we don't find some way to fix this soon I may decide to haul the truck to somewhere with concrete and use our standard hoist.


Thanks, and Happy Tinkering!
-CalIDI
 

IDIBRONCO

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Re torque heads (didn't remove bolts, just go through the torque sequence)
That's a good thing to do occasionally.
Install the Driver's side Motor Mount
It's easier to install at least the part that bolts to the block while the oil cooler is still off.
I removed the oil cooler and have the rebuild parts but haven't gotten the oil cooler apart. Its soaking with PB blaster for a bit. Any tips for separating the oil cooler? I really don't want to break it.
I'll try to explain how I take this apart. I use a 58oz. dead blow. A rubber mallet would probably work, but a dead blow like mine is faster. If you look at the assembled oil cooler, there's two parts the stick out away from the cooler and attach to the block. I'll gently tap on that and the opposite side. When the endcap starts to get a little bit cocked to the side, I'll (gently) tap that stocking out part on something like a wood block to push it back straight. Eventually, the endcap will come off.
 

CalIDI

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Quick update
Oil cooler is apart, tool a little ingenuity and a slight amount of heat to loosen up the OEM rubber. Looks to be in good condition internally. I could not clear out the center tube, but all of the other passages in the main body are clear. I figured one partially blocked passage was better than causing it to crack. I tried all the gun cleaning kits around, but none of ours have thin enough rods to fit. I think my truck is telling me to get more gun cleaning kits. Instead I used a length of wire to push through the tubes.

I still need to finish re assembling the oil cooler, but the hardest part should be past us.
 

Old Goat

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Here is some good info on the Oil cooler by Genscriptor.


I went through the Oil Cooler puking oil into the Cooling system a few years back.
Better to do the new "O" Ring and paper gaskets with the engine sitting in front of you.

There is a metal tab on each end to pry off the end caps.

I polished out the inside of the caps with some very fine wet/dry sand paper maybe 1000 grit, to make sure there was nothing to nick the new "O" Rings.
I used my 20 ton HF Press and Syl-Glyde for the lube get the them to seat. Did one end at a time, with lower end on a piece of hard wood I had. Just make sure you are pushing on even and straight.

If the end caps aren`t perfectly lined up, they will rotate.

I found a remanufactured MC Cooler, one on RA and the other on Parts Geek. Now all I see are the Dorman Coolers.


Might be a good idea to remove the bolts on the valve Covers, blow out the holes with Carb Cleaner, and blue Loc-Tite them. Seems to keep them tight longer w/o the oil leakage.

edit:
Came across this oil cooler thread in one of my folder of saved stuff.

 

CalIDI

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Thanks for the tips!

I've used that IDIonline place before. Good info right there.
I don't have a press yet, so I may use a bench and a jack, or ratchet strap and wooden blocks.

Hopefully in a couple of days the oil cooler will be properly assembled, and bolted to the engine. Then its just about engine swap time.

I don't think I need to test the oil cooler once its put together. What do y'all think? Should I?


Thanks, and happy tinkering!
-CalIDI
 

hacked89

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Thanks for the tips!

I've used that IDIonline place before. Good info right there.
I don't have a press yet, so I may use a bench and a jack, or ratchet strap and wooden blocks.

Hopefully in a couple of days the oil cooler will be properly assembled, and bolted to the engine. Then its just about engine swap time.

I don't think I need to test the oil cooler once its put together. What do y'all think? Should I?


Thanks, and happy tinkering!
-CalIDI
How do you plan on testing the oil cooler if I said “yes”
 

Farmer Rock

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I believe I remember hearing of the IH dealers pressurizing the oil cooler with compressed air. You just have to figure out how much psi, and make all kinds of adapters. There was an old thread on this.

Rock
 

hacked89

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I believe I remember hearing of the IH dealers pressurizing the oil cooler with compressed air. You just have to figure out how much psi, and make all kinds of adapters. There was an old thread on this.

Rock
Yep I know how but was curious what he was going to say
 

CalIDI

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Yep I know how but was curious what he was going to say
I would have made adapter plates and then pressurized the coolant passages with approx. 13psi, filled the oil passage with water, and watched for bubbles. Then dry it like crazy and use carb cleaner (won't hurt rubber) to force the residual water out, and then flush it with oil.

It seems like more work than its worth to test it.

I could also do the inner tube method, but that only checks for internal damage to the cooler bundle, not proper O-ring seating.

Thanks, and happy tinkering!
-CalIDI
 
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