EGT questions

Nero

HD Diesel nut
Joined
Jan 3, 2022
Posts
2,640
Reaction score
2,759
Location
OR
I was talking with a buddy of mine, he was down to get a used truck, but his wife was dead serious about wanting to only by NEW because she didn't want the bill of fixing an older truck. I tried to explain to her that you'll spend significantly less money on a vehicle plus repairs, but she wasn't willing to hear it.

I guess its just how some people are. Rather be in debt than use not so common sense.
 
Last edited:

FrozenMerc

Full Access Member
Joined
Dec 21, 2018
Posts
257
Reaction score
452
Location
SW Missouri
Wait until the first repair bill comes in on the new 6.7 PSD. I ran a fleet of F450's and F550's at my last job. Everytime something went wrong, it was a minimum of $5K. $0.99 O-ring on a coolant line failed, and start leaking coolant. Just happened to be next to the air intake, and the coolant ingestion took the turbo out. $8,500 (in 2020 Doll Hairs) just to replace the turbo and Coolant o-ring. I can put 3 turbos and all the coolant lines in the world onto my '85 for that kind of cash.
 

Cubey

Van dweller
Joined
Oct 18, 2017
Posts
4,236
Reaction score
1,673
Location
USA
I was talking with a buddy of mine, he was down to get a used truck, but his wife was seas serious about wanting to only by NEW because she didn't want the bill of fixing an older truck. I tried to explain to her that you'll spend significantly less money on a vehicle plus repairs, but she wasn't willing to hear it.

People have extreme phobias about older vehicle breaking down, I suppose mainly because they don't know how to fix things and the fear of the unknown is a powerful thing. And if they have kids, the fear can be even worse.

They seem to think it's going to be breaking down every few weeks, and that it's going to constantly leave them stranded, where as they think something brand new won't have any problems at all.

Some people are just bad at buying used vehicles too, I suppose. I've been pretty fortunate myself, all things considered.
 

Old Goat

Full Access Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2021
Posts
1,796
Reaction score
1,817
Location
Northern Nevada
You never see older vehicles on the road. When I was a kid, (Graduated in 62) use to always see older vehicles. Always wanted a 50 Ford, back then, but my Dad didn`t want any junk sitting in front of the house.
Guess that`s why I have 15 or so parked all around here.

Today, I couldn`t tell you what name or model these darn things are, They all look the same.
In the old days you could tell a Ford from a Chevy, or a DeSoto, Buick etc...
Today my truck is 38 yrs old and my car is 42 yrs old.

Last Sept we drove across Nv., Ut., Wyo., and into North Dakota and back.
"You took that old truck?, shuda rented a car". We have rented cars, that is why we take the old dependable truck. Just rolled 350K yesterday.

If Iam going to spend $100K dollars on a truck, better and a K or a P at the start of the name.
If the majority of the public knew, that a lot of these Semi`s are pushing 3 million miles and still going, would blow their minds.

No one can work on anything new, unless you have the Thousands of dollars worth of test equipment, and the training on how to use it and diagnose the problem, plus the special tools for that vehicle.
I remember my Mercedes mechanic working on an 06. Had the program from MB, and was still pulling his hair trying to work through it.


Goat
 
Last edited:

ISPKI

Welding/metallurgical engineer/Metalsmith
Joined
Jul 13, 2015
Posts
1,116
Reaction score
696
Location
Granby CT
Your last statement is a cheap excuse. New vehicles arent difficult to work on and they arent that expensive to work on if the person doing the work has some ounce of ingenuity. I have done plenty of work on our Volvo, doesnt seem any more difficult than any other vehicle ive worked on, might even be easier since the car just tells me whats wrong with it rather than having to go hunting for it.

I'll put it this way, just adjusting my IP timing on my idi is more of a pain than anything ive had to do on our volvo and thats coming up on 200k quick.
 

Cubey

Van dweller
Joined
Oct 18, 2017
Posts
4,236
Reaction score
1,673
Location
USA
I remember my Mercedes mechanic working on an 06. Had the program from MB, and was still pulling his hair trying to work through it.

That's why I've never tried to buy a Smart car. They require special Mercedes tools.
 

Cubey

Van dweller
Joined
Oct 18, 2017
Posts
4,236
Reaction score
1,673
Location
USA
Your last statement is a cheap excuse. New vehicles arent difficult to work on and they arent that expensive to work on if the person doing the work has some ounce of ingenuity. I have done plenty of work on our Volvo, doesnt seem any more difficult than any other vehicle ive worked on, might even be easier since the car just tells me whats wrong with it rather than having to go hunting for it.

I'll put it this way, just adjusting my IP timing on my idi is more of a pain than anything ive had to do on our volvo and thats coming up on 200k quick.

How new are you talking? Cars from 20 years ago were in a transitional period. Some still had cable driven throttles but a few years later, on the same models, that was done away with for computer controlled throttle.
 

ISPKI

Welding/metallurgical engineer/Metalsmith
Joined
Jul 13, 2015
Posts
1,116
Reaction score
696
Location
Granby CT
How new are you talking? Cars from 20 years ago were in a transitional period. Some still had cable driven throttles but a few years later, on the same models, that was done away with for computer controlled throttle.
Well, thats fair. Our volvo is from 2012, design carried thru until they revved it up in 2016 so, 9 years ago I suppose? It does have alot of electronics, electronic steering, electronic throttle, etc etc. I believe there was a significant leap in vehicle technology during covid, so its likely that everything built after 2019 is going to be more complex, although that may be for the better.

If we all recall working on early EFI tech dating back to the 70s or 80s. That tech was miserable. Nothing was intuitive and everything was cheap junk that fell apart inside of 10 years time, cost a ton to replace, failed for no good reason. New electronic equipment has evolved by leaps and bounds. Modern vehicles are more powerful, more efficient, more comfortable, more features, safer, cleaner, and oftentimes cheaper for what we are getting.

MSRP on a 1995 F350 started at 22k, that would be around 46k in today's dollars. A similarly equipped 2024 F350 MSRP is 51k and its a LOT more truck than it was in 95.
 

Nero

HD Diesel nut
Joined
Jan 3, 2022
Posts
2,640
Reaction score
2,759
Location
OR
New exhaust is in, new isspro gauge is in, just waiting on the down pipe and wastegate block off kit. Will probably have to stop this weekend at some point and get an extension for the 3" exhaust since I have a cclb
 

Lumberjackchuck

Full Access Member
Joined
Jan 23, 2023
Posts
156
Reaction score
158
Location
New Jersey
New electronic equipment has evolved by leaps and bounds. Modern vehicles are more powerful, more efficient, more comfortable, more features, safer, cleaner, and oftentimes cheaper for what we are getting.

Yeah but when you get EMP’d by some high altitude nukes those solid state electronics are done.

Also with these advances in the tech, who knows, maybe you’ll get ransomware’d or hacked and not able to use your vehicle.

My allure to this truck was the simplicity and knowing that if SHTF I’m good to go.
 

ISPKI

Welding/metallurgical engineer/Metalsmith
Joined
Jul 13, 2015
Posts
1,116
Reaction score
696
Location
Granby CT
Yeah but when you get EMP’d by some high altitude nukes those solid state electronics are done.

Also with these advances in the tech, who knows, maybe you’ll get ransomware’d or hacked and not able to use your vehicle.

My allure to this truck was the simplicity and knowing that if SHTF I’m good to go.
Modern vehicles are actually better shielded than old vehicles. Electronic shielding started being developed way back in the 60s with the developed of EFI, as they discovered that the injectors could missfire from interference caused by the ignition coil. Early EFI wasnt well shielded, but they did incorporate capacitors and grounding to absorb the static.

The electronic devices in our IDIs are actually not shielded at all and are far more susceptible to interference from an EMP than any new vehicle. All of the relays in our trucks would be cooked, that means no starter relay, no glowplug relay, no fuel shutoff solenoid, no automatic transmission. You could get around most of this, except for the FSS, im not sure how one could bypass that being locked closed, maybe open it up and manually disengage it? Then you wouldnt be able to shut the truck off without opening it up again.

Modern electronics on the other hand are required to be enclosed in electronic shielding with grounding circuits and capacitor systems to prevent outside interference from radio waves, spark plugs, ignition coils, etc.
 

Nero

HD Diesel nut
Joined
Jan 3, 2022
Posts
2,640
Reaction score
2,759
Location
OR
Brief update on the down pipe. Its en route, but won't see it til probably tuesday. Frustrating because I paid for 2 day shipping, and due to a checkout calculation error they switched it to 3 day without telling me.
 

ISPKI

Welding/metallurgical engineer/Metalsmith
Joined
Jul 13, 2015
Posts
1,116
Reaction score
696
Location
Granby CT
Brief update on the down pipe. Its en route, but won't see it til probably tuesday. Frustrating because I paid for 2 day shipping, and due to a checkout calculation error they switched it to 3 day without telling me.
sounds like a shipping cost refund hopefully?
 

Nero

HD Diesel nut
Joined
Jan 3, 2022
Posts
2,640
Reaction score
2,759
Location
OR
sounds like a shipping cost refund hopefully?
I asked, they said "it actually cost an extra $20 to do the 3 day shipping that we didnt bill you"
My retort was I'm working on a schedule I would have happily paid $100 for the 2 day so I can work on it sooner.

Oh well, **** happens.
 
Top