So what did you do with your truck today?

IDIBRONCO

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That dang magnet pickup....


I ordered a light haha I tried for a good hour to get a reading, followed the directions to the T, read the forums a little. Turns out the mag pickup just is awful.
I agree. I ordered the light right away, before my meter even came in, Because that's how I was taught and used the meter. Now, seeing all of the issues that people have with the mag probe, I know that I made the right decision.
I swear it weighs 200lbs.
It probably does, but that's how you know that you have a good one without looking inside it. I was told that the older, good ones use copper windings while the newer, cheaper ones use aluminum. That accounts for the difference in weight. It should work like a charm.
 

chillman88

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was told that the older, good ones use copper windings while the newer, cheaper ones use aluminum. That accounts for the difference in weight. It should work like a charm.

I paid $75 for it.... Forever ago. If it doesn't work and isn't repairable, it'll make great garage art and I could scrap the copper and double my money LOL
 

Nero

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I like the mag pickup. Did you watch my video? I also added a pinned comment not too long ago about needing to change the pulse if you have newer style coated ip lines.
I hadn't seen it. I'm already back home away from the in laws idi. Thing has rough starts. Smooths out but if you run it neutral at 2k rpms it starts to smoke. Only did it after throwing in unknown injectors. Also found the fuel pump is leaking externally, so I just said to the in laws, leave it parked. Parts are on their way.
 

hacked89

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I hadn't seen it. I'm already back home away from the in laws idi. Thing has rough starts. Smooths out but if you run it neutral at 2k rpms it starts to smoke. Only did it after throwing in unknown injectors. Also found the fuel pump is leaking externally, so I just said to the in laws, leave it parked. Parts are on their way.
Sounds like you got more than timing fun to be had.
 

chillman88

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Got the fuel tank and toolbox back in today too. As usual didn't get as much done as I wanted, but solid progress.

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Got my 38gal tank in the truck so I can take it to work and do some things to it. I'll post that in my build thread when it's done.
 

bilbo

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Hauled this about 30 miles to my house. Wasn't sure the Ole tow truck had it in her, but after I rocked it back and forth a half dozen times I got momentum enough to make it roll, so I knew I was golden. It's a 1985 garage kept Snapper with the bagger!
I’m pretty sure I have a newer version of this same mower. Mines a 28”, one big blade. It cuts nice, fits through a gate, and was cheap. The only thing I don’t like is all the interlocks. The most annoying was a mechanical system that didn’t allow you to reverse with the mower running until you push a little lever in. I’ve managed to bypass that one, the rest I can live with for now. Yours might predate some of that stuff. Sometimes I think I want a zero turn but then look at the price tag and the old Snapper don’t look too bad.
 

XOLATEM

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I paid $75 for it.... Forever ago. If it doesn't work and isn't repairable, it'll make great garage art and I could scrap the copper and double my money LOL
Uh...first off that thing is beautiful in an antique and built in america sort of way...and it will probably work like it should when you factor in the fact that Lincoln Electric is still around...

But...I would not try to test it out until you have removed the cover and inspected it for dust and nests and cleaned it out.

Dust is conductive and can fry stuff...and arc things that will screw up the works. and...remember that you CAN NOT turn the amp adjustment while it is running...you will arc the crud out of it and weld things together internally.

That machine is basically a huge transformer with a manually adjustable rheostat...with an esthetically pleasing container.

Careful...

I have an old Sears Colormatic that I got for 75$ as well...it was my first welder...in the 80's. Sooner or later I will make a cart for it and group it with other welders 'n such.
 

chillman88

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But...I would not try to test it out until you have removed the cover and inspected it for dust and nests and cleaned it out.

Absolutely. The cord is in pretty bad shape too. Might work for testing quick but I certainly wouldn't trust it. Very badly cracked.

The leads must have been replaced at some point because they look fine.
 

DrCharles

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But...I would not try to test it out until you have removed the cover and inspected it for dust and nests and cleaned it out.

Dust is conductive and can fry stuff...and arc things that will screw up the works. and...remember that you CAN NOT turn the amp adjustment while it is running...you will arc the crud out of it and weld things together internally.

That machine is basically a huge transformer with a manually adjustable rheostat...with an esthetically pleasing container.
In the really old stick welders I have seen, the crank physically moves either the primary coil with respect to the secondary, or moves part of the core creating a magnetic shunt (can't recall, it's been a long time). But either way, it ends up with a continuously variable adjustment with no increments/steps. I don't see why that couldn't be moved with the power on since the circuit is not being broken.

On the other hand, my "newfangled" Lincoln 225 buzz box (only about 40-50 years old) has a huge rotary switch with taps. THAT will indeed internally arc and destroy itself, if the switch is turned while welding.
 

chillman88

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In the really old stick welders I have seen, the crank physically moves either the primary coil with respect to the secondary, or moves part of the core creating a magnetic shunt (can't recall, it's been a long time). But either way, it ends up with a continuously variable adjustment with no increments/steps. I don't see why that couldn't be moved with the power on since the circuit is not being broken.

On the other hand, my "newfangled" Lincoln 225 buzz box (only about 40-50 years old) has a huge rotary switch with taps. THAT will indeed internally arc and destroy itself, if the switch is turned while welding.

I know that the front lever turns a gear inside that makes the indicator on the back move. I haven't opened it up yet to see exactly what all moves though. I'll probably post up a couple pictures for you guys when I do.
 
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