Trailered home a 1989 F350 dump truck that looks great on the outside, but the 7.3 IDI is something else

IDIBRONCO

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I'm torn on getting a ridge reamer vs. taking it to someone. If I take it to someone, I was thinking of having the block (and heads) hot tanked as they are nasty. Of course of I have it hot tanked, I'll need to completely dismantle the block and pull the cam bearings and have them install new ones. That will probably make it a pretty expensive job.
If you take it to a shop, they can remove the old cam bearings. You won't have to. If they're all pretty bad/nasty,greasy, it wouldn't be a bad idea to have it all hot tanked. You don't have to, but it sure makes things nicer to work with clean parts. Expensive? Maybe. It cost me $170 to have my block hot tanked, the cylinders honed, and new cam bearings installed. I supplied the new bearings and it was over 6 years ago. It was also done by a guy who does engine work in his spare time, after his full time job so that price means nothing today. You can call to ask about prices. I'm not trying to spend your money for you. Only giving my opinions here. One last observation, you've already removed the pistons so you're almost done with the disassembly right now. Not to mention that NOW will be the time to reseal your oil cooler, but you probably already know that.
When I overhauled the engine in my Blue Truck in 2018, I didn't have a parts cleaner or solvent tank. I bought a metal oil drain pan, a 5 gallon bucket of solvent, and a parts cleaning brush. I cleaned the majority of my engine parts (aside from the block and heads) with that and blowing them off with compressed air afterward. That took more effort on my part, but it saved my money by not having them hot tanked. It also gave me the opportunity to look over everything else for defects. The more that you can do yourself, the more money that you save.
What gasket kit would you guys recommend? This one?
I don't have any experience with the Mahle gasket myself. You should be fine. My only preference is for Fel-Pro over Victor Reinz Because the Fel-Pro head gaskets are .010" thicker. Otherwise, I'd use either brand.
Is there anything I can do about that, like maybe now press the new seals all the way in so that they won't ride the same groovers?
They make repair sleeves for both the balancer and the crank.
And these would be the rings, right?
Those sure look like the right ones.
 

crazydane

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I think I'm going to compromise and clean the engine myself, but take it to a shop to ream the ridges and give it a hone.

Got the oil cooler, crank and camshaft out this morning along with the squirters. I than rolled the block outside and sprayed it down with some degreaser:

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Worked it into the exterior sides with a stiff brush and then power washed it, then dried it with a leaf blower, and then when got all the holes with compressed air. I then repeated the steps a 2nd time.

Before:

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After:

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Not perfect, but a lot better than before. I than rolled the block back inside and sprayed the bores and bearing faces with some WD40.

Amazing how much room a engine like this takes up once torn down:

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So on the gasket set, I'll grab the Fel-Pro one, believe the part # is 260-1673.

Summit has it, and it's quite a but cheaper than the Mahle set too:


The picture is wrong, but that should be the one, at least according to Fel-Pro themselves:


Good deal on the sleeve repair kits, I'll start looking for those.

Am I correct in assuming that if I don't want a block heater, I can just replace it with a free plug? Hole looks exactly the same size of the free plug ones.
 

IDIBRONCO

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The factory freeze plugs are special. They're stainless steel, require a special driver to install them, and actually bite into the metal of the block. I'm not sure if the block heater hole is the same as the others or not. I've heard of regular freeze plugs falling out of the holes while driving. My opinion is that if you don't want to block heater, put it in and then don't have the cord on the truck.
 

Old Goat

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Here is a few threads on the freeze plug tool and how to install them. They are a special Stainless Plug.

Freeze Plug # E3TZ-6026A
OTC/SPX tools 303-D045






Old Bull passed away a few years ago, but some pictures of the tool he was making


This thread has the drawings on the Dimensions of the tool if you want to make one.



Goat
 
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crazydane

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Thanks for the education on freeze plugs on the IDI! Didn't realize they were special. If I take the block to a competent shop for the re-hone, hopefully they would have the tool, especially if they work in IDI engines, although I'm guessing that's becoming more scare these days.

Only reason I was contemplating it, is due to the condition of my block heater:

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The O-ring is very loose and I don't need a block heater since I'll only be using this truck when the weather is nice.

I read up a little on when to use a reaming tool, and it seems its primarily used BEFORE pulling the pistons to prevent the rings from breaking or causing damage to the ring landings on the piston. Like I said above, they came out pretty easily with just some light tapping, but I did break a number of rings, so in hindsight, maybe that was from removing them.

I'll be sure to inspect the pistons in greater detail, but I didn't notice any obvious damage when removing them. Speaking of which, that one piston where a glow plug had broken off into, it looks like they were all indentions, and nothing really is protruding above the surface:

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And I see nothing at all in the dome of the cylinder head. Its possible to heads were swapped out at one point I suppose.

I get to clean the cylinder heads next:

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Once I get them cleaned up, are there any areas in particular I should inspect for cracks?
 

IDIBRONCO

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The O-ring is very loose and I don't need a block heater since I'll only be using this truck when the weather is nice.
You're probably right about not having the correct installation tool. I'd put a new o ring on it, put some RTV around the outside to help keep possible leaks away, and then install it again. Just because it's there, doesn't mean that you have to use it. Before you install the block heater, clean the hole up with a wire wheel on a drill or even some sand paper by hand to remove build up. That helps keep possible leaks away too.
 

XOLATEM

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Since you are familiar with the Summit website...something like this will keep your shop floor cleaner when you go to re-assemble the engine...

I have a similar one and it is much appreciated....I plan on building an engine once I set up a building to do it in..

@IDIBRONCO ... I want to thank you for the info, as well...

@crazydane ...you seem to be rocking along on this one...

More power to you...no pun intended...I appreciate this project and the pics...it gives me a heads-up on what I have in front of me...

Thank you, gentlemen...
 

crazydane

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@IDIBRONCO Thanks for the advice again. I'll clean up the hole and get a new o-ring.

@XOLATEM You're very welcome! And good idea about a drip pan.

Spoke to machine shop that caters primarily to rebuilding diesel engines and he quoted me about 4 hours max @$110 to run a ridge reamer, hone the bores and then jet clean it after to make sure all the shavings/grit is removed.

Before taking it to him, he said to hit the bores with some 80 grit and then 180 grit at the spots with the worst rust, so see how deep the pitting was.

Well, I did that, and it looks like I do have some pretty deep pitting unfortunately.

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So now I'm thinking its not worth it to sink another $440 in shop time into this engine, so I'll probably just pick up a ridge reamer for $84 and do it myself:


And a $30 cylinder hone tool and hope for the best.

Again, I just need something that runs reasonably well around the property.
 

crazydane

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I once picked up 5 MEP 802A 2 cylinder generators with Lister Petter diesel engines that had been sitting for years with water in the cylinders. They started out like this:

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And cleaned up to this after soaking in Evapo-Rust for a few days:

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Reused the pistons and put new rings on them and honed the bores. Unlike the 7.3, these had low hours to begin with, so no rim ridge, but still had pitting. But despite the pitting, they make good compression and produced full power after running them for a few hours under load.

Hopefully the same will be true of this 7.3 engine. I'm sure I won't get 250k miles out of it, but if I can get 10k, which will probably take me 15 years, then I'll be happy.
 

Old Goat

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@IDIBRONCO Thanks for the advice again. I'll clean up the hole and get a new o-ring.

@XOLATEM You're very welcome! And good idea about a drip pan.

Spoke to machine shop that caters primarily to rebuilding diesel engines and he quoted me about 4 hours max @$110 to run a ridge reamer, hone the bores and then jet clean it after to make sure all the shavings/grit is removed.

Before taking it to him, he said to hit the bores with some 80 grit and then 180 grit at the spots with the worst rust, so see how deep the pitting was.

Well, I did that, and it looks like I do have some pretty deep pitting unfortunately.

You must be registered for see images attach


You must be registered for see images attach


You must be registered for see images attach


So now I'm thinking its not worth it to sink another $440 in shop time into this engine, so I'll probably just pick up a ridge reamer for $84 and do it myself:


And a $30 cylinder hone tool and hope for the best.

Again, I just need something that runs reasonably well around the property.
Read the reviews about the Amazon tool. Some had trouble etc... and for others it worked great.


Goat
 

crazydane

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Yes, I read the reviews. I'll be sure to follow the advice of those that did get it to work. Should be here Thursday along with the hone attachment. My challenge in the past with an electric drill hone tool is that the drill won't go slow enough to make a a proper 45 degree angle. I think my newish brushless electric drill will go pretty slow, so hopefully I won't have to raise and lower the hone like a madman anymore. :) That's how I broke my previous hone when I accidentally pulled it too far out of the bore. It just broke apart with pieces flying everywhere.
 

crazydane

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Gave the heads the scrub down with degreaser and power washing, dry with leaf blower, then compressed air. Looks a ton better now:

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As with the block, not perfect, but good enough for what its for. I did notice cracks around all the glow plug holes on the compression side:

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Is that pretty typical? Should I be worried about it?
 

IDIBRONCO

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I have a similar one and it is much appreciated....I plan on building an engine once I set up a building to do it in..

@IDIBRONCO ... I want to thank you for the info, as well...

@IDIBRONCO Thanks for the advice again.
You're welcome guys. I may be taking my own advice here soon since I may be planning to pick up another engine this weekend. It may be junk, it may be savable. I figure that if all else fails, and the block is junk, I happen to know a guy who has an extra short block sitting around so all may not be lost.
Is that pretty typical? Should I be worried about it?
Fairly typical. Nothing to worry much about. It's said that as long as the cracks don't extend past the fire ring, (the metal part of the head gasket around each cylinder) then you'll be fine.
 

crazydane

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One interesting thing I noticed is that the serial number of the original engine in the 89 F350 truck was 649677 and the serial of the 89 F250 donor is 638837, so a delta of 10,840. Door sticker on the F350 has a 12/88 date code, so I guess it was a pretty early 89 truck. Makes me wonder how come the 89 F250 donor has an even lower engine serial number than that. Maybe they didn't put them in the trucks in the order the engines were manufactured?
 
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jwsfarrier

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I have heard of the rubber expansion plugs in place of the freeze plugs. Similar to the block heater just without the filament. Is this good info. Thought this might be another option for you.
 

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