Showerhead filter alternative?

Old Goat

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Did you check here?



Goat
 

12pilgrim

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Years ago when BOTH my shower heads broke off, I dropped both tanks (thankfully very clean inside) cleaned the outside and brushed-on gray rustoleum (looked pretty!)
Then ran fuel rated hoes on the inside with maybe stiff tubing inside to keep it rigid and just an 1/8" or so off the bottom of each tank... BUT... instead of using a filter on the 'inside of the tanks' I simply plumbed-in two exterior inline clear canister diesel rated WIX fuel filters on the outside of the tanks... works like a charm!
I changed them last year and you could see the little bit of debris that was caught in the filter and not permitted to pass through to the mechanical lift pump.
Unfortunate, my sending units have taken a crap and I'm not about to drop those tanks again... but I also don't believe aftermarket senders are available for my 1988 F250 SuperCab.
Check these out!

87-89 Front tank sending unit:

87-89 Rear tank sending unit:
 

Old Goat

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The link I posted and the E-Bay Senders are probably all made in the
same Chicom assembly line.

If you are going to keep your IDI for the long term, be a good idea to
purchase a couple back ups while available.

Remember, these are OHM specific for what ever year or generation etc...

When I did the 38 gallon install, I put new one`s in both tanks as well as
2 back ups. I did keep the old one`s though for what ever reason. :dunno
Go to war with China, there goes all our replacement parts.


Goat
 

needlenose

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Fellas..

Newish front gas tank. New sending unit 3yrs ago. Changed fuel filter, full of rusty junk. Pulled sending unit, totally rusted! About to pull and clean tank out and get new sending unit ($31 on ebay)

1. Anyone use an alternative screen instead of the prone to break off showerhead in tank filter?
2. What happened?? Maybe bad fuel (always Sams Club) that had water contamination caused all the rust?
Post 6

I replaced the front tank last year and the strainer looked just like it did when I put it in. 0 problems in about 10 years of service. Back in it went.
 

12pilgrim

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Maybe it's another part of the plan to try to force us all into electric vehicles?
I love my old vehicles (most of the time). I can't imagine owning something new and impossible to work on at home (paying labor at a dealer!). Even worse, an electric vehicle.. that's a compromise almost as ridiculous as giving up guns.
 

HammerDown

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Check these out!

87-89 Front tank sending unit:

87-89 Rear tank sending unit:
Has anyone purchased to know how the work... and for how long?
 

Azidiguy

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I had a 460 to start so i still have the electric low psi in tank pumps which i have the mechanical pump pull through them since they flow freely even when off. This gives me a prime pump as well as delets the shower head issue. Have bypassed the mechanical pump amd ran the electrics to get around till i got a replacement. Hope that helps.
 

MIDNIGHT RIDER

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Thanks for all the links and information on replacement gauge senders.

Years and years ago, on one of these diesel Ford sites, there was an excellent write-up on how to replace both sending units with generic J.C.Whitney units that just happened to be the correct ohm-whatever to work with our gauges (1983-1986)

I gathered in the J.C.Whitney sending units and fixed both of my long-dead original senders; and, those generic units, like most of my other generic el-cheapo replacements, have long outlasted the originals by many years.

At the time, like always for me, it took every nickel I could scrape together to just buy the necessary senders; I wish now that I had laid by a couple extra for both tanks --- who knows, although they work wonderfully today, they might quit tomorrow.

When I did my senders, I took extra special pains in bending the rods and such so that when the gauge reads E, there are about nine drops left in the tank; and, it doesn't stay on F for three hundred miles and then fall like an anvil; and, FULL is needle on F, not an inch past F.

I did the same when I put the SunPro gauge and sender in my 52-gallon auxiliary tank.

As for the original tank selector valve; after having at least three brand-new Ford units run me out of fuel and shut me down in terribly inconvenient places, and now I am actually glad that they did, I ditched the electric valves and have been using two 4-position manual valves; one switches Draw and the other switches Return; you can't imagine how handy it is to be able to return fuel to a tank different from the one you are drawing from.


As for pre-straining the fuel; someone already beat me to it with an excellent idea of using clear see-thru filters OUTSIDE the tanks.

My idea was to employ a pair of See-Thru GoldenRod Filters ahead of the selector valve; my GoldenRod Filters are one of my favorite modifications; I never have to change a fuel filter - ever.
 

ROCK HARVEY

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This is the one I bought for my side tank on my 89 about two years ago:


I transferred the sender piece onto the existing metal plate attached to my pickup tube. I seem to remember some modification was required, but overall it was easy and has worked great so far. Another issue I had with my gauge was that the flexible circuit board on the back of my gauge cluster is cracking and separating, and the fuel sender circuit is the closest one to the edge and was the first to go. I had to run a separate wire to bypass the cracked part.
 

WrenchWhore

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When I did my senders, I took extra special pains in bending the rods and such so that when the gauge reads E, there are about nine drops left in the tank; and, it doesn't stay on F for three hundred miles and then fall like an anvil; and, FULL is needle on F, not an inch past F.
This cracks me up lol. My fuel gauge reads almost exactly like this. I set mine to read max E with about 5 gallons in a 38 gallon tank. I did this since I have no baffles in the tank and when the fuel sloshes it could suck air. The jury is still out if my gauge reads way past the F mark. I'm sure it will. Would this be an indication that my sending unit is the incorrect OHMs? I've heard a bad sending unit can kill a dash gauge if it stays maxed out for long periods of time.
 

MIDNIGHT RIDER

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when the fuel sloshes it could suck air. The jury is still out if my gauge reads way past the F mark. I'm sure it will.

Everybody goes into a big panic about an indirect injection engine sucking air into the draw line; these engines are and always have been self-bleeding, providing there is fuel to pick up.

I have watched people swap fuel filters and then go through a big ordeal "bleeding" = absolutely hogwash and no need whatsoever.

If you have enough battery, an engine that has ran dry of fuel will pull up the fuel, fire off, and run with no bleeding whatsoever.

Back when we all had 6.9 diesels long-hauling cattle (and now with the direct injection 6BTs), we would run a tank until the engine stumbled and ran out of fuel; switch the manual fuel valve to another tank, and the engine would pick it up and be running strong within half-a-mile at road speed.


When a gauge reads way past full, the float is as far up as it will go and submerged.

The float rod needs bent, or lengthened or shortened, such that when the float is against the top of the tank, the needle is on the F, not way past the F.

There are two variables governing level and duration of the gauge; rod configuration and "Sweep"

Sweep is achieved by lengthening the float arm.

E being E and F being F are governed by the height of the pivot point; you want the pivot point exactly in the center of the tank's capacity.

Get the pivot point above center and the needle will be on E a long time before the tank is Empty.

Get the pivot point below the center and it will show F a long time.

Before bending anything or lengthening/shortening anything, you want to find exactly the center of fuel depth with a full tank and raise or lower your pivot point to match that.

Then, you want the rod long enough that the float doesn't stop in it's travel until it is either touching the bottom of the tank or against the top of the tank.

With a tank that has clean lines, not all deformed, set your pivot point at exact center and lengthen the arm until the float can touch top and bottom; then, make any fine adjustments from there.

It helps if the tank is bone dry.
 
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