Charging question

Rocknit4x4

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mf7lakes

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Any of you guys ever used a battery terminal like this ------>
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Old Goat

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I have this type Battery Clamp on my batteries


They also make this style.


Go down to your local NAPA, and they will make up Cables any length you need.
Have Ring terminals crimped on.


Goat
 

BeastMaster

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Another hint at finding the bad connection...

Disconnect the ground of one of the batteries. Attempt a quickie start. You don't need to actually start the engine, you just need to use the starter motor as an electrical load, as well as an acoustical "meter" and listen to it. Good vigorous crank? Then the sole battery that had the load circuit is probably fine.

Reconnect the ground you had removed, and remove the other battery ground. Again attempt a start. Expect it to fail.

Your problem is somewhere in the circuit that won't give a vigorous crank. Bad connection or failing battery.

If both configurations work, I'm stumped.

Safety note ...

I think everybody here knows this...but I warn again for the sake of those new to this forum is that really bad things quickly happen if one isn't aware of this safety precaution. Tools will weld themselves into the worst place possible.

Removing the ground side of the batteries first is a safety thing. Messing with the positive side of a battery rail with metal tools without disconnecting BOTH battery negatives FIRST is a very risky endeavor considering a slipped metal tool bridging the positive battery rail to frame ground.
 

mf7lakes

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Hey -- Beast-O-Master -- followed your instruciones - disconnected driver's side negative -- truck started immediately. Then reconnected same -- then disconnected pax side negative -- no dome light, no nuttin' ....

Borrowed a good multi-tester for the big red positive cable -- mostly tested totally open - no continuity at all. Wiggled the leads around, when it did show some continuity, it showed up to 250 ohms.

Haven't gotten under there yet, but does the big red starter wire usually have a 90° bend in it's connector ???

Thanks to you and everyone
 

BeastMaster

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Mf7lakes : Very happy you found it. There is nothing like the peace of mind one gets once one knows where the problem is.

FWIW, my van does not have a sharp bend in the heavy battery bus. I also consider it poor practice to sharply bend wires, especially large wires, due to the tensile stress placed on the wire along the outer radius of the bend. It promotes metal fatigue and stress cracking, followed by corrosion.

I wonder if truck electrical shop or welding shop would have the proper crimpers and connectors/lugs to fabricate a replacement link for you. Old Goat mentioned NAPA had tools to make these on the fly. I had to fabricate replacement links when I replaced my glow plug wiring, and fabricated integral fuse wire so that a disaster at my glow plug relay wouldn't fry my batteries or wiring harness. A caveat I ran into is selecting proper wire insulation compatible with under-hood temperatures and oils.

Personally, I like to crimp then solder, the solder mostly acting as a filler to keep any battery acid from wicking into the connector. Dielectric grease would help too to displace contaminates.

I have the same kind of battery lugs Old Goat posted above. Whichever kind fit best. I have up to four ring terminals on each battery lug. My heavy circuits are the starter motor, alternator, glow plugs, fuse box main feeder, and an auxiliary power distribution relay / fuse box for toys.

( Fuse wire aka a "fusible link" is just plain stranded copper wire, it's just that it's insulation is appropriate for containing the aftermath of molten wire and arcing upon circuit overload, with the link designed to fail first by sizing it about four gauges smaller than the wire it is protecting.)
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nelstomlinson

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Three wire gauges smaller means half the area, twice the resistance. 4AWG smaller should definitely fail first. NOT using the special fusible link wire would have the advantage you could see the failed bit.

I eventually bought a nifty hydraulic crimper set used on fleabay. For a long time, though, I used a cheapie Chinee hammer crimper tool. It was awkward, but as long as I could take the wire out and lay it on the floor, the cheapie worked.
 
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