Left Glow Plug Switch On Fried Something

TrueBurner

Registered User
Joined
Oct 4, 2021
Posts
28
Reaction score
3
Location
California
Left my glow plug switch on after starting and driving my truck. Not sure if it got switched on by accident after starting it and driving because I usually turn it off after 10 seconds before starting truck. Anyway about a hour later I was near my truck and it had that electrical burn smell, opened the hood and the starter solenoid was smoking. Wasn't sure what was causing it until I realized the switch was still on. First off I thought the system that was installed with a breaker would prevent anything like that and the breaker was indeed tripped. Second, I replaced the starter solenoid and the ring terminals that were doing the smoking. I did not replace the entire wiring line, just cut the wire shorter and put new ring terminals on. After doing that, still no luck with getting the glow plug switch to engage now, put a backup switch on to see if it was that but nothing. Not sure where the issue may be stemming from. Truck still started this morning but had to spray some starter fluid to get it going. Once warmed up, truck still starts and runs fine.
You must be registered for see images attach
You must be registered for see images attach
 

IDIBRONCO

IDIBRONCO
Joined
Feb 5, 2010
Posts
12,299
Reaction score
11,009
Location
edmond, ks
You must use a momentary switch to prevent this from happening again. Glowplugs are not cheap.
100%!
A breaker only prevents any draw over what it's rated for. If your draw is less than that, then a breaker won't help. You most likely burned out your glow plugs first and then some wiring. The starter solenoid was probably smoking because of the constant power going through it which made it hot. I feel that you got lucky and found this out before costing you more money and possibly a break down while driving. You'll need to replace your glow plugs and check all of the glow plug wiring for signs of getting hot.
 

Rdnck84_03

Full Access Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2019
Posts
1,118
Reaction score
1,195
Location
Kansas
You must use a momentary switch to prevent this from happening again. Glowplugs are not cheap.
Definitely agree! I would never chance the glow plugs with any kind of a switch that didn't default to the off position.

I have my high idle and cold advance on toggle switches and have numerous times forgotten to turn them off.

James
 

TrueBurner

Registered User
Joined
Oct 4, 2021
Posts
28
Reaction score
3
Location
California
Amazing feedback, thank you all! I inherited it like this and obviously don't have enough knowledge yet to know I should have changed certain things. I just took it to a friend of mines who way better at knowing how electrical works since thats not my forte. So there is power getting to the solenoid from the breaker and the switch. But there is no power going to the post that connects to the glow plugs. Which makes me believe it's not necessarily the glow plugs that need replacing potentially because there is not even any power getting to the post on the solenoid. Is that assumption correct? Possible just a dead solenoid on arrival? Which wouldn't surprise me as I got the only cheap one that I could get locally
 

TrueBurner

Registered User
Joined
Oct 4, 2021
Posts
28
Reaction score
3
Location
California
We did a voltage test on the solenoid and everything checked out but the post on the solenoid that attaches to coil and then leads to glow plugs had no charge. So we didn't even use the meter to check on the specific glow plugs because we thought there is no power going to them from the solenoid itself. Would dead glow plugs make it so that post wouldn't get any charge at all? We came to the conclusion that if the post had voltage and it still didn't fire than it would be glow plugs or wiring connecting to plugs but if the post had no voltage than it must be the solenoid. Not sure how close we are in our conclusion.
 

ironworker40

NYC Ironworker
Joined
Dec 16, 2013
Posts
939
Reaction score
19
Location
nj
Put a test light wire on the positive on the battery. Touch pointy end of test light to each glow plug with wire removed. The ones that don't light are dead. Pull all glow plugs even the ones that test good and look at the tips. Use momentary switch like other have said or fix glow plug controller and let it work automatically. Either should not be used unless glow plug power is disabled.
Buy a Ford shop manual and Diesel supplement. You will need it now and in the future.
 

XOLATEM

Full Access Member
Joined
May 5, 2023
Posts
600
Reaction score
783
Location
Virginia... in the brambles


This is what I use...had it left over from the 1980's...

I had a van that the alternator would not charge unless I 'tickled' it...and bought a spare in case I torched the first one...

mounted this on the dash of my current truck and bathe in the memories of driving that van and being...'The Transmission Man in the Van'...

Works good for my glow plugs...less amperage flowing though it...should last for a good while...

This will work better for you...it is truly 'momentary'....
 

tbowker

Full Access Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2023
Posts
322
Reaction score
414
Location
Hudson, Florida
This is what I use, I use the same type to start the truck also. I have a toggle switch for the run position and the key only unlocks the steering.
 

Attachments

  • Screenshot_20240114-090941_Chrome.jpg
    Screenshot_20240114-090941_Chrome.jpg
    110.1 KB · Views: 4

Old Goat

Full Access Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2021
Posts
1,632
Reaction score
1,621
Location
Northern Nevada
Both of mine have a push button, but I have seen spring loaded momentary toggle style also.

James
I use one like this.


On my 86 it is mounted just to the left of the GP Light ready to start thing. Drilled a hole in the black plastic panel and isn`t noticeable.
With key on, count 6 - 8 or ?? depending how cold it is.


Goat
 

IDIBRONCO

IDIBRONCO
Joined
Feb 5, 2010
Posts
12,299
Reaction score
11,009
Location
edmond, ks
Would dead glow plugs make it so that post wouldn't get any charge at all?
No. The current flows from the solenoid to the glow plugs not the other way around.
Not sure how close we are in our conclusion.
Sounds pretty close, but you still need to check your glow plugs while you're in there.
but I have seen spring loaded momentary toggle style also.
That's how my Blue Truck was set up when I bought it and it's still that way today.
 

Latest posts

Forum statistics

Threads
91,257
Posts
1,129,303
Members
24,082
Latest member
Bsthomas21
Top