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Block heater thought?????

Discussion in '6.9L IH & 7.3L IDI Diesels' started by Darrell Martin, Nov 13, 2020.

  1. Christian9112

    Christian9112 Full Access Member

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    I was about to buy the same product but the truck had something else in mind. The water pump started leaking haha. My oil temps doesnt warm up as fast as the coolant. it takes about 30 min to get the oil up to 150f. When I start up the engine, oil pressure seems so slow to get up at 40psi at 50f. I think oil heater like that is good because you need warmer oil than you need warmer coolant. Ive also looked in to pad heaters. In the end, I think im going to be using a coolant reservoir from a prius. Its like a huge hydroflask that keeps the coolant warm. instead of coolant, I would run oil on it. so the next time I start the truck, it would have warm oil ready to go.
     
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  2. Darrell Martin

    Darrell Martin Registered User

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    Thank you. I thought I had put all that info in before but maybe I was hi or something. LOL just kidding, but that's for the input
     
  3. Darrell Martin

    Darrell Martin Registered User

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    Could I use both? The water heater and the magnetic heater? Heck I guess I could mount a electric heater in the nose and plug it to my genny. Lol
     
  4. IDIBRONCO

    IDIBRONCO IDIBRONCO

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    There's no reason that you couldn't use both. Just don't try to run them off of the same extension cord. It may work if it's a really heavy cord, but I think that it could be asking for trouble.
     
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  5. ttman4

    ttman4 Last Nite's Dream..

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    Yeah Darrell & Bronco, as I posted in #18 post I used too small of cord (100' 16ga) running my 1000wt block heater & nearly burned the house down with us in it.....& the breaker didn't trip either.

    Same thing could happen if you overload even a bigger cord, or pull too much off of one plug-in, or too much off of one breaker that doesn't trip!

    ANSWER: 2 cords.....one for one heater plugged into your plug-in in garage......other cord for 2nd heater.....and wait till after dark & run next door to neighbor's garage & plug it up there.

    My 2 cents....:angel:.:Thumbs Up :angel: :Thumbs Up
     
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  6. Darrell Martin

    Darrell Martin Registered User

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    Thanks guys:Thumbs Up:cheers:
     
  7. ttman4

    ttman4 Last Nite's Dream..

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    Hi in the Cascades, Nearly- Redmond,Oregon
    Anytime.....
     
  8. u2slow

    u2slow bilge rat

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    The bigger problem is corrosion on the prongs and inside the receptacle. Those points are doubled with an extension cord. Female sockets with poor tension contribute. These act like resistors and become the hot spots. A thicker gauge cord only reduces the symptom.

    There's no excessive current coming down the cord; that's why no breakers trip. Voltage-drop alone (thinner/longer cord; yet of adequate ampacity) only lessens the output of the block-heater because they are resistive - not like a motor that tries to compensate low-voltage by taking more current.
     
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  9. nelstomlinson

    nelstomlinson Full Access Member

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    Yep! If there is heat in the outlet, the problem is in the outlet, not in the cord.
    You had a high resistance in that outlet, probably because of weak tension and a bit of corrosion, as u2slow said. If it was just the cord being too small, the cord would have been hot, and the outlet would not.
     
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