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Can this be fixed?

Discussion in 'Paint and Body' started by clifdawg, Apr 11, 2016.

  1. clifdawg

    clifdawg Full Access Member

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    I know anything can be fixed one way or another, but can this be fixed without cutting a whole new bed front and welding in place?

    This is a short bed that's in overall good shape, but this would be an eye sore for me, for sure.

    [​IMG]

    What would you guys recommend? I'm definitely no body man, but I will try my hand at fixing it.
     
  2. IDIoit

    IDIoit MachinistFabricator Supporting Member

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    most of us have this issue.
    this goes back to my rant about all truck boxes.
    why they didnt use thicker steel is way beyond me.
    i will be pulling the bed, cutting this piece out, and using thick walled box tubing.
    never again have this issue.
     
  3. clifdawg

    clifdawg Full Access Member

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    Sounds like a good plan. I may end up doing the same, as that would probably be the best option for the long-haul.
     
  4. IDIoit

    IDIoit MachinistFabricator Supporting Member

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    im also going to be gutting the inside of the bed.
    installing a perimeter of box tubing and putting in a diamond plate floor.
    the bed will be heavy, but the box area could use some weight.
    also make it easier to tie stuff down.
     
  5. laserjock

    laserjock Almost there... Supporting Member

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    If I were going to tackle that, I would make a vertical cut on either side of the kink, pull it out and the n replace the bent up metal.
     
  6. clifdawg

    clifdawg Full Access Member

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    Thanks laser. What do you think about IDI's idea of replacing the whole top square with a thicker square tubing?
     
  7. IDIoit

    IDIoit MachinistFabricator Supporting Member

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    theres a million ways to skin a cat, but only 1 way to deep fry them!

    there really is no right or wrong way to go about this.

    it all depends on your skill and will.
     
  8. laserjock

    laserjock Almost there... Supporting Member

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    I think his plan is good too. I think it's more work though. Comes down to what you want. If you want to put heavy wall stuff in there so you don't bend it again, do it. If you just want to fix what you have, then do that. Like Brian said, lots of ways to skin the cat.

    I disagree on one point though, I spent some time in the south and they know several ways to deep fry things... I've seen everything from deep fried water mellon to deep fried coke syrup.
     
  9. IDIoit

    IDIoit MachinistFabricator Supporting Member

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    LOL
     
  10. junk

    junk Full Access Member

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    If'n it was me. I'd weld up a quick U-shaped hook to get on the back side of that. Then use a come a long to pull it back into place. You may need heat to get the buckles out. Or maybe just some hammer work to get them back into submission. Worst case I'd cut them to relieve pressure. Then weld the cuts closed again once straight and pounded flat or possibly replace a small piece of material. Replacing that whole panel or even just the top to get rid of that buckle seems like a lot of work to me.

    If I remember correctly that is basically an open C-channel. If I wanted to strengthen it I would nest a piece of structural metal in the inside and either bolt it in or do some spot welds.

    I'm not sure I've ever seen one of these trucks where that panel isn't bowed let alone kinked. Completely agreed pickup boxes are completely too flimsy.
     
  11. clifdawg

    clifdawg Full Access Member

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    Appreciate all the advice, guys!

    I've not tried any deep fried watermelon down here, but I have had a donut burger. ;)
     
  12. laserjock

    laserjock Almost there... Supporting Member

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    Nothing like driving by the Krispy Kreme and seeing the fresh doughnut sign on. -Drool

    There are things I miss about the south. Mainly the people and the food. You can keep the heat, humidity and tornados. LOL
     
  13. Crankybait

    Crankybait Full Access Member

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    Drill a 5/16" hole in the deepest part of the crease. Find a piece of metal about the same size of the bent area, drill a hole thru it to. Place it in the area behind the bend and run bolt with a short piece of chain thru the hole and place a nut on the backside. Attach a chain from the rear of the truck somewhere. Use a come along to pull the panel rearward and gently with a hammer massage the creases to flatten them out as the panel comes back into shape. Once straight, weld up the hole and add whatever bracing you desire.
     

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