New injector pump install this weekend

Brian VT

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A rebuilt injector pump (from 1 of the recommended 4) is supposed to be here tomorrow and that's my plan for the weekend.
I replaced my injectors (from the same rebuilder) a few weeks ago and it was a huge improvement. Then the no hot start started.
So I had to save up $ for the pump. I guess I should have waited until I could afford both at the same time.

So what are the odds that I can reuse everything except the old pump? (o-rings, etc.)
Or should I wait and buy all that stuff again before getting into this?
 

IDIBRONCO

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There's no need to remove anything other than the old IP and lines since the lines attach to the top of the injectors above the return caps. One way to look at this is that you don't have many miles on the new injectors so they still have the same life span as the new IP. Another way to look at it is that you now know why they should be replaced as a set.
 

Brian VT

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Cool. Thanks.

Another thought.
I read the instructions in the Tech Article. Very good stuff. He mentions tightening the lower fuel lines to the pump "properly" before installing the pump as they are difficult (if not impossible?) to tighten after the pump is in place.
I'm nervous about having them leak, or over-tightening them. And also not having them lined up, rotationally, before installing the pump.
Advice on this?
Is it possible to leave the fuel lines connected to the injectors when changing pumps? If so, how to remove/tighten the lower fuel lines at the pump?
 

IDIBRONCO

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You remove the IP and the lines as one piece. that way, you can work on switching the lines over out on a bench. Honestly, if there's one available, I like to stick the pump in a vise to make it easier to loosen and tighten the lines. I put the part that the nuts tighten against the jaws and have the lines sticking straight up in the air. I only do this for the initial loosening and final tightening of the lines. Leave the line clamps on the lines and remove one side (driver's or passenger's) at a time. They will come off as a set of four. That way, you have an example of how they came off and go back on. Just match up the positions of the lines on the two pumps. Just as an extra precaution, while the lines are off, I like to spray through them with some carb or brake cleaner and then blow through them with compressed air. I'm not sure that there's a reason when swapping the lines right from one pump to another like you're doing. it's just a habit from the days when I used to work on these engines for a living and we had several sets of lines on a shelf. Those may have been sitting there for many months or even years. In that case, it's good to make sure that there's nothing built up in the lines.
 

Old Goat

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NO, the Fuel lines stay connected to the Pump, as the Pump has to be moved to the rear and up as you wiggle it out.

I have not R&R a Pump yet, removed several at PNP.
I don`t see why you couldn`t just swap over the lines as an assembly, (all connected together) then they should be in the right orientation to line up with the Injectors.
Do this before installing the Pump.
It is just a Ball and Socket type seal where the lines seal up.
Snug them up line where they connect to the injectors.
make sure you leave the vibration clamps connected.

If Iam wrong, one of the Big Guns will straighten me out. -Flame Thr

This would be a good time to delete the hard line to the pump and do away with the Olives.


Goat
 

IDIBRONCO

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I don`t see why you couldn`t just swap over the lines as an assembly, (all connected together)
Right except that they come off in sets of four. Driver's side and passenger's side. They are not connected in a set of eight. When you remove them one side at a time, then you can see where you removed them on the old pump and get the installed on the new pump right.
 

Old Goat

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Correct. I should have typed 2 sets or assemblies of 4.
What Iam thinking and typing always come out different.

That`s a good idea of putting Pump in a Vice to install the Lines.

Goat
 

gandalf

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That is absolutely right. Remove the lines and the pump as a unit, all connected. You can then remove the lines from the pump as 2 separate units, left and right. Be sure to leave the line clamps in place. This way you have plenty of space to loosen the lines, as 2 separate units, and move each unit to the new IP.

And, of course, a picture to show before the lines are removed from the IP. We all love pictures.
 

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Brian VT

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Got the old pump off.
The 2 lower nuts I took off with my fingers. I guess the last guy to mess with it gave up on getting tools in there.
There were just nuts on all 3 studs. Should these have lock washers?

Also, what would having only 1 nut tight have been doing to how my truck was running?
 

Brian VT

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Should I try to get some fuel into the pump before connecting the fuel supply line to help get things flowing faster?
 

IDIBRONCO

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Should these have lock washers?
No they have flat washers.
Also, what would having only 1 nut tight have been doing to how my truck was running?
Since you were experiencing the hot start issue, probably nothing. Even if it did, you know that it was time for an injector pump anyway.
Should I try to get some fuel into the pump before connecting the fuel supply line to help get things flowing faster?
If your fuel filter is full and your lift pump is working, then you should get fuel into the pump quickly enough. I like to hold the throttle pedal to the floor while using the starter until the engine runs. Then I let it idle and smooth itself out on it's own.
 

IDIBRONCO

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No. You'll be fine. My opinion is that if you just use the nuts, then eventually, they'll wear into the flange on the pump.
 

Brian VT

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Success.
It was a long day but I got it done.
No special tools. Stubby open-end wrench for the nut under the cold start. Had to grind one thin for the other side. The box wrench part.
A couple screw ups.
I forgot to swap the fitting at the end where the line from the filter head connects. Luckily was able to install it after the pump and other lines were already installed.
There's a metal rod that I think is a kickdown lever? I manged to put the injector lines on top of it so the lines couldn't get where they wanted to be. I didn't want to take the pump back out. The rod wasn't connected to anything topside when I got the truck anyway, so I cut it near the back and snaked the offending piece out. ;-)
Truck runs great and restarts warm now. It rolls coal a bit sooner now. I don't know if Russ turns the fuel up a bit on his pumps? I still need to time it also.
Good for 100k, I hope.
 
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