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New Fuel Tank Selector Valve?

Discussion in '6.9L IH & 7.3L IDI Diesels' started by aggiediesel01, Feb 19, 2019.

  1. aggiediesel01

    aggiediesel01 Registered User

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  2. Shadetreemechanic

    Shadetreemechanic Full Access Member

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    I put one in my 85. Was not drop in for me because my wiring harness was old. Should work for your 91 as drop in.
     
  3. Oldenglish82

    Oldenglish82 Registered User

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    How did you do yours? I have an 86 and am thinking of doing the same.
     
  4. Shadetreemechanic

    Shadetreemechanic Full Access Member

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    It works perfectly, but you have to steal the electrical plug off a later model truck and splice it in.
     
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  5. IDIoit

    IDIoit MachinistFabricator Supporting Member

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    direct replacement for your 91 as stated.
     
  6. aggiediesel01

    aggiediesel01 Registered User

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    Thanks for the input guys. For a sixth of the price of the OEM and the only seemingly no cut and splice option, I'm giving it a shot. I'll post back if it's a disaster.
     
  7. lakesurfer

    lakesurfer Registered User

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    Looks right, because it looks just like the one I bought for mine. Here's my warning though, because I really wish I had gone another route!: The fuel line connectors that mate to that switch are (as far as I can tell after way too much time researching) absolutely no longer available and no one is making aftermarket versions. So my situation is that I have a brand new selector switch, and am wondering if those ancient connectors contribute to some of the air in the fuel line that I observe.

    Yeah, the o-rings inside can be carefully picked out, and replaced with the closest viton match in your o-ring kit, but to me that's still a variable.

    In retrospect, I wish I had done one of two things:

    1. Used an aftermarket switch (about $50), and cut off all those connectors and gone to fuel hose and ring clamps. Ugly, but would have been easier to replace on a trip if needed. Parts easier to get.

    2. Replaced the whole switching setup with manual brass valves. There's a killer thread here on OB that illustrates how @bike-maker did it and it's amazing. Never ever fix again. This is what I'll do next time.
    https://www.oilburners.net/threads/fuel-selector-valve-nightmare.50704/page-4
     
  8. rwk

    rwk Full Access Member

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    I have decided to go with the brass 6 way valve, see my post, "fuel tank share", I have a C&C and have no other fuel tank options and want to use my rear 30 + gallon plastic tank, give me about 50 gallons, I figure stock lines have reached their age limit and the problems associated with there connection flaws. Most of the things the company's come up with are for ease of assembly and there profit, good and safe designs no less, but don't think they planned on 25 plus years of use! I'm replacing it. Maybe some can help with the sending unit switching?
     
  9. rwk

    rwk Full Access Member

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    I was getting tense removing and disconnecting the lines on the tanks, clips were breaking, just knew plastic lines would buckle and break or kink, plastic and rubber DO have a safe life expectancy, just like brake lines.
     
  10. papadiesel

    papadiesel Full Access Member

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    Yes fantastic price I paid 180 for mine same exact thing
     
  11. aggiediesel01

    aggiediesel01 Registered User

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    I put one on my dads truck tonight, 15 min and other than the diesel bath I got it's great. No drips after a 2 hour trip. Nice being able to use the other tank again. It took longer to type this up than it did to do the job.

    Now he's got to carry a extra spare filter with him as he starts to use the previously non-functional tank again as it's been quite a while and the diesel that drained from that line smelled suspect.

    I would suggest that one learns about how the the plastic locking clips work before one starts digging in there with a screwdriver. I will note that there are 2 sizes of clips, black and opaque, the opaque ones are commonly available at napa and other places. Not sure about the black ones. Once you figure out how they lock into place it's not difficult to pop them out.

    Procedure is:
    -Unbolt the unit from the frame (so you have some maneuverability to reach all the lines). Note that the switch body has nut-serts pressed into the plastic, it's possible and common for these to pop loose while loosening the bolts. You may need a wrench and some creativity to get them out if they break the switch body plastic or you can't get them to stay in place while pulling out the bolts. You might want to soak them with penetrating oil a few days before trying this and to top it all off, the nut-serts seem to be some kind of locking thread so the threads are tight all the way out.

    -Undo the electrical connector and plug in the new switch while it's hanging there.

    -Operate the new switch a few times to make sure it's working correctly; you can hear and feel the motor moving the valves inside.

    -Pull out all the locking clips on all the lines. You may have to remove one of the top lines headed to the motor to get access to the last clip or two but luckily that one doesn't drip much if the truck has been off for a while.

    -Get the new switch ready to go in your off hand, oriented in the correct direction.

    -Remove the top lines, Bottom lines, and then pull the old switch forward off the rear lines. Be ready for your bath.

    -Stuff the new switch onto the rear most lines as quick as possible, hopefully they didn't swap places like mine did in the heat of the moment; then push on the bottom lines and finally push on the top ones.

    -Re-install all the line clips noting that the black clips go on the three lines closest to the frame and the opaque ones go on the lines closest to middle of the truck.

    -Plug in the electrical connector if haven't already done this. Note the electrical connector is a really tight fit btwn the frame rail and the switch body if the switch is bolted tight to the frame.

    -Bolt the new unit back to the frame and motor on with your life and re-activated fuel tank.

    If your truck is really dirty under there, I'd recommend power washing that area before you get started to minimize the possibility of dirt intrusion into the fittings and your eyes.

    If one of your tanks has been unusable for a while be extra sure to carry a spare fuel filter or two and wrench with you. Keep an eye on the little red Fuel Filter light on the dash you might actually see it light up if the algae clogs get bad.
     

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