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ARP stud install and engine tear down

Discussion in '6.9L IH & 7.3L IDI Diesels' started by Jimmy Stewart, Sep 13, 2018.

  1. Jimmy Stewart

    Jimmy Stewart Full Access Member

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    So I’ve started tearing down the engine so I can install ARP studs. Here is a picture of the engine when I started with just injectors and air cleaner removed. 1986 F350 6.9 idi.

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    Next I removed the drivers side valve cover with a half inch socket or wrench. There is 8 bolts and 8 shims and the shims will fall off so pay attention to catch them when removing bolt.

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    Last edited: Sep 13, 2018
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  2. genscripter

    genscripter Full Access Member

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    You should update your first post with the year and other pertinent info of your truck and engine.
     
  3. Jimmy Stewart

    Jimmy Stewart Full Access Member

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    Here is a pic with both valve covers off. Had to remove fuel filter to get to one of the bolts and the very back one is PITA but it can be done with a half inch wrench. Now I’m scratching my head as to what needs to be done next, I guess I’ll start with the intake manifold. It needs a good cleaning anyways. Also as you can see in second picture there is only 6 injector lines. I left the bottom 2 on. They will come out with IP.

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    Last edited: Sep 13, 2018
  4. Jimmy Stewart

    Jimmy Stewart Full Access Member

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    Very good point. Updating now.
     
  5. genscripter

    genscripter Full Access Member

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    A little late now, but I would have left my injector lines attached to my IP. Just makes it easier to keep them in order, and also, one less thing to have to reattach when you put it all back together. :Thumbs Up


    When you remove your Injector Pump, DON'T remove the gear house cover. Just open the front plate, undo the 5/16" 12-pt bolts, then remove the 9/16" retainer nuts on the back of the gear house cover, and then pull the IP toward the back of the truck.

    Here's a vid of me doing that in a van, which is much harder than doing it in a truck. So it'll give you some helpful advice:



    Here's a picture of the 5/16" 12-pt bolts in the gear housing:
    [​IMG]






    If you pull the IP + Gearhousing, then you have just misaligned your timing, and you'll need to pull off the front cover to retime the gears. But if you leave the Gearhousing in place, the IP gear cannot skip a tooth (there isn't enough room in the housing to have the gear misalign), and when you reinstall your IP, you just need to line up the stud on the IP cam to the gear to get it back into running order.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Jimmy Stewart

    Jimmy Stewart Full Access Member

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    Very helpful, thank you!
     
  7. Jimmy Stewart

    Jimmy Stewart Full Access Member

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    So I got IP out. Was actually easier than expected. I removed the two bolts that hold oil filler neck, then marked the 3 bolts and the little nipple with dashes on flange. After that I used 9/16 wrench to remove the three nuts with washer on backside. Disconnected the fuel lines and all other connections. Popped it right out. I’m getting a new pump so did I still need to mark flange for timing???

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    I do have a concern. When I was taking off the small electrical connectors on the pump (I believe there was 3) I noticed that 2 were rotted and cracked and not really connected. It appears they go to the glowplug harness... Any insight on this. I also noticed when I removed oil filler that it had some water inside of it, is this normal? It wasn’t a lot, just some beaded up on top of the oil.
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2018
  8. Jimmy Stewart

    Jimmy Stewart Full Access Member

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    Also, can I use stainless steel hardware for valve covers, IP, filler neck, etc...???
     
  9. steelheadguy

    steelheadguy Registered Idiot Supporting Member

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    Following. Thanks for the pictures and updates. Much appreciated since I will be doing this sooner or later.
     
  10. Jimmy Stewart

    Jimmy Stewart Full Access Member

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    No problem. I saw some writeups of bits and pieces of the tear down and rebuild but not one of start to finish so figured I would do one.
     
  11. IDIBRONCO

    IDIBRONCO IDIBRONCO

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    Nope. That's what the dowel pin is for. The pump will only go on the gear one way. When you put the new one back on, sometimes it's difficult to line up the dowel pin and the slot in the pump. I'll take a small flat tip screwdriver and stick it through a bolt hole in the gear. That way I can turn the pump a little bit to line it all up. Next you'll also have to remove the rocker arms and the push rods. If you have the money, now will be the time to buy some new "7.3 style" rockers that don't use that aluminum pedestal. They have issues with breaking and you can't buy new ones. If you don't have the money for those, give Thewespaul a PM. He said that he has several sets of good used ones. Don't forget to unbolt the exhaust pipes from the manifolds before you try to lift the heads. You could remove the manifolds to make the heads weigh less and to lessen the chances of damaging a new gasket by dragging a manifold across it (been there, done that). The manifold bolts can be a HUGE pain to remove though. You could remove the heads with them attached and then, while they're easy to get to, take them out with an impact wrench. You'll have to remove at least part of the HVAC box, maybe do something with the shifter linkage, probably have to cut off part or all of the remaining insulation that's right behind the shifter linkage as well. I know this from doing R&R jobs on heads in chassis. These are tight spots with bolts so I can't imagine putting the heads abck on with studs installed in the block. One more thing that I did before the stud install was to buy a big container of ARP stud lube from Summit racing. I don't feel like the little bit of lube that ARP sends out is enough and I didn't get any when I bought my 7.3 studs from Justin. That was ok since I already had the big container.
     
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  12. IDIBRONCO

    IDIBRONCO IDIBRONCO

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    A couple of more things that I forgot. You will need to remove your alternator, vacuum pump, filter housing, power steering pump, and A/C compressor. These are attached to the heads. Leave the two brackets that are attached to the front of the heads. You can use them for extra grabbing surfaces. trust me, you'll thank me for that one. The water pump can stay on the engine. This would also be a good time to install a new Motorcraft thermostat too. That way you housing will also be out of your way and the surface underneath it will be very easy to clean up with no head in the way. When I was younger and dumber, I would take a bundle of shop rags and put them someplace to rest my head so that I could remove and install the heads by standing inside the engine compartment using my head like a tripod for extra leverage. These days, I'll just pull the engine.
     
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  13. Jimmy Stewart

    Jimmy Stewart Full Access Member

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    Very helpful info. Thanks for that. That’s a great idea with brackets, never would’ve known.
     
  14. Jimmy Stewart

    Jimmy Stewart Full Access Member

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    @IDIBRONCO any ideas about those electrical connectors on IP mentioned in previous post?
     
  15. IDIBRONCO

    IDIBRONCO IDIBRONCO

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    You're welcome. I'm full of something. Exactly what probably depends on who you ask. I do try to make it useful information instead of other things. The driver's die head is easier to hold on to in the back. There is three "bumps" (for lack of a better term) that you can hold on to. The back side of the passenger's side head is flat with very little to hole on to. If you're doing this by hand (Vs. using a cherry picker) make DAMN sure that your hands are clean and fairly oil free when you try to install this head. I hated it because I was always nervous about dropping the head onto the new gasket.
     
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