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Fall Foliage In Maine,When To Visit

Plan your fall foliage,leaf peeping trip in Maine.Millinocket,Maine October 11, 2015

Fall Foliage In Maine,When To Visit
FORDF250HDXLT, Sep 3, 2017
    • FORDF250HDXLT
      Chasing the Great Bear

      In ancient times, three young men, the bravest hunters in the world, set out with their dog to track a bear at the first snowfall. The bear had made crisp paw prints in the cold, fresh crystals, leaving a trail that the hunters could track with ease. Each print pushed deep into the snow and covered a wide area: this bear would be huge, a worthwhile catch.

      After months of following, the men began to lose confidence. The bear had led them across the globe, from the east where the sun rises to the west where it sets. All of the best hunting techniques had failed them, and eventually, they realized the bear was leading them away from their homeland, up into the sky.

      The hunters called out to each other and tried to turn back, but it was too late to return to the ground. All they had left then was the hunt, so they vowed to speed up and catch the bear. After days of straining and fatigue, never stopping to eat or sleep, the hunters were on the brink of collapse when they finally caught up and killed the bear. It had been almost a year; autumn was upon them again.

      They slew and cleaned the bear, laying it on a bed of oak and sumac branches. Its blood stained the leaves red, and this is why leaves of these trees turn red in the fall. The hunters scattered parts of the bear they couldn’t use toward different ends of the earth. The bear’s backbone formed a constellation to the north, its head to the east, both of which can be seen on the midnight horizon in the middle of winter.

      We love this Native American story because it brings humans a little closer to the wonders of the natural world. Another version also explains the Little Dipper from a Native American perspective: three of the stars in the cup represent the bear, while the four that form the handle are the hunters with their dog in tow. The constellation is visible year-round because the hunters are eternally chasing the bear. The next time you’re atop a mountain in New England or gazing at the stars, you can think back to this Native American story about autumn and remember that the bear and the hunters are keeping you company in the sky.

      One of Our Favorite Native American Stories About Autumn
      ...............................................................................................


      Where should I go if I'm coming to Maine during the week of:
      Please note that these dates are typical projections dates and can fluctuate by 2-3 days.

      September 15 - 20:
      This is the very early stage of our fall foliage season. To find color, we suggest you travel to northern Maine - Aroostook County, Aroostook State Park, Allagash Wilderness Waterway, Fort Kent, Presque Isle, Ashland, Mars Hill. Peak color typically occurs in these locations the last week in September.
      Foliage Regions: Northern Maine (Zones 6 & 7)

      September 22 - 27:
      Maine is traditionally experiencing less than 30% color change at this time of the year. Higher elevations in northern areas display the most color. We suggest you visit Sherman Mills, Baxter State Park, Shin Pond, Ashland and Portage.

      September 29 - October 4:
      Maine's hillsides are beginning to blush with more than half of the trees displaying fall colors. The best locations to leaf peep are anywhere in northern Maine, like Aroostook State Park, Route 11, Eagle Lake Public Reserved Land unit, Pittston Farm, Kineo and Rockwood.

      October 6 - 11:
      This is the best week for Peak Color in central Maine. Fall foliage color is in full swing in western and central Maine: Visit Grafton Notch State Park, Route 17 near Richardson Lake, Bigelow Preserve, Route 27/16 in Carrabassett Valley, Cathedral Pines Rest Area in Eustis, the lookout from Eustis Ridge, Mt. Blue State Park in Weld, Tumbledown Mountain Range, Greenville, Moosehead, Jackman, Lily Bay State Park, Rockwood, Sebec Lake and Dover-Foxcroft.

      October 13 - 18:
      Best week for Peak Color in western and southern Maine This is one of the peak weeks for leaf peeping as peak conditions are coloring Maine hillsides. Visit Fryeburg, Bethel, Rangeley, Mt. Blue, Skowhegan, Farmington, Rumford, north of Portland and the greater Augusta area.

      October 20 - 25:
      Best week for Peak Color in southern and coastal Maine. Find peak color south of Portland, Sebago Lake region, Bridgton Limerick, Waterboro, Kennebunk, Kennebunkport, Wells and York.

      Where and when can I see peak color in Maine?
      • Northern Maine: Last week in September, into the first week of October.
      • Central and Western Maine: Second and third week of October.
      • Coastal and Southern Maine: Third Week of October
      • See When & Where to Visit for a chart of historical peak foliage dates, and more trip-planning information.
      MaineFoliage.com - Maine's Official Fall Foliage Website

      If your planning a trip to Maine,this will help you hit our peak fall foliage season with the spectacular,vibrant leaf colors.
      This pic was taken in Millinocket,Maine October 11, 2015.I went and climbed Katahdin,during peak fall foliage season back in '15.I wont ever do that again!It was blustery cold up there!After,I drove around leaf peeping and snapped this pic just outside of town.
      Come on up!Don't forget a light jacket and your cameras.If your coming to camp around leaf peeping season,then be sure to pack your heavy sleeping bags.The temps are really dipping at night around now.We'll have some freshly baked pumpkin pie ready and keep the hot chocolate and coffee on for ya.:)
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